teach me Lord to wait

Teach Me, Lord, to Wait

“Dear Lord, You know my pain, You know how desperate I am for You to heal me.  I ask You to help me and teach me to wait on You.  I know your timing is perfect and I will wait on You to do your miracle in me.”  This was my son’s prayer one night as he faced a chronic illness two years ago.  I was humbled by that prayer.  Tears ran down my face, not only because of the sweetness of his prayer, but also because at that moment my child trusted in a God Who could do immeasurably more than what we can imagine – but I didn’t.

My son had understood something I had, for a while, forgotten:  to trust and wait. I was tired of hearing my child moaning in pain all day. I was tired of having to watch what he ate, tired of having to spend two hours at the grocery store reading every product label yet not able to find much food that would not harm him more.  I had to go on medical leave and homeschool him.  I had detached myself from a set routine and I didn’t like it.  Our whole family dynamics had changed and I was becoming desperate.  I had asked many times for a “right now” miracle to ease my desperation.  I wanted everything to go back to the way it was.  But that night I understood the source of my despair. It made sense and it hurt.  A 10-year old’s humble prayer had reminded me that I was not in control of the situation.  I wanted it done in my time and not God’s, and I was ashamed.

Waiting on the Lord can test our faith. I realized that not wanting to wait meant I was not recognizing Him as the source of all authority.

In one of her blogs, Sylvia Gunther puts it like this: As we wait, God is revealing His perfections, His impeccable ability to be in charge of every detail. His timing is split-second. He is omniscient, omnipresent, and omni-caring. He works all and in all. He gives confirmations of His ever-present-ness. He gives us assurances of His real power over the enemy that is not seen. His Holy Spirit focuses us. We want proof, but faith is the substance (not the evidence) of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen (Heb. 11:1). The Holy Spirit says, “I am giving you the substance of faith.” He gives the grace to await His purposes until the precise moment when He gives evidence that He was working all along. Without this faith, it is impossible to please Him, for all who come to God must believe that He rewards those who earnestly seek Him (Heb. 11:6).

In Scripture I was reminded how to wait on the Lord:

Quietly and Patiently: “Be still before the LORD and wait patiently for Him.” (Psalm 37:7); “But if we hope for what we do not yet have, we wait for it patiently.” (Romans 8:25)

I was reminded to wait only on Him: “Yes, my soul, find rest in God; my hope comes from him.” (Psalm 62:5)

I decided to wait on the Lord like my son, and, like Abraham, who “…after waiting patiently, … received what was promised (Hebrews 6:15).”  When I finally became obedient and waited, I was able to experience God’s power and grace through my son’s illness and eventual healing.

May we all learn to wait quietly and patiently on Him for His perfect timing and answers to our prayers!

Ana Cuevas

Ana Cuevas

Interim Assistant Director. Ana has served as GCW District Director, worship leader, Children’s Ministry Director, and short term missions trips coordinator. Ana is an elementary school teacher. She is also a district’s superintendent’s wife. Her family attends the Spanish CMA in Kissimmee, Florida. ana@greatcommissionwomen.org

One Response to “Teach Me, Lord, to Wait”

  1. Dear Ana and GCW team, this post truly blessed me. Particularly the truth that faith is the substance (not evidence) of things hoped for. So often I’m in it for the immediate answer, not the process of what Jesus is working in and through me while waiting for the answer. Such a beautiful reminder of the nearness of Jesus. Thank you!

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